Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Exploring Economic Inequality
AS.001.132 (01)

In this First-Year Seminar, we examine inequalities in income, wealth, and working conditions in the United States today. What do the historical trends look like and how do economists explain them? Is economic inequality a significant problem? If so, why? And what tools do we have in the policy arsenal to address it? We will draw on diverse sources, including economics readings, op-eds, podcasts, and short vignettes from literature to motivate our weekly discussions. Students will have the opportunity to present group research and lead class discussions drawing on the economic concepts developed in class. At the end of the semester, students will complete an individual research project exploring some aspect of current inequality, inspired by their own selection from literature, poetry, music, or film.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 9:00AM - 11:30AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (85)

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent COVID crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:  05-30-2023 to 06-30-2023
  • Instructor: Kodua, Nino
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (85)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:  05-30-2023 to 06-30-2023
  • Instructor: Zheng, Xudong
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: What Is Poverty? A View from Economics and the Social Sciences
AS.001.149 (01)

Social science is the scholarly study of society and social behavior. This First-Year Seminar will introduce students to the social sciences by studying poverty in America through the lens of economics and other social sciences, including sociology and anthropology. The quantitative approach taken by economics will be compared and contrasted with qualitative approaches. Illustrations of how the lives of the poor are led as depicted in ethnographic studies, movies, and literature will be studied to learn how integrated perspectives can be formed. Students will learn how to read scholarly articles with a critical eye, to speak about their interpretations of the material, and to write short critical essays. Students will also be introduced to quantitative analysis using graphs and tables. Group projects will be required. Guest lecturers bringing non-economics perspectives will visit the class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Moffitt, Robert A
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Economic Experience of the BRIC Countries
AS.180.214 (01)

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, the Chief Economist at Goldman Sachs, coined the acronym BRIC to identify the four large emerging economies, Brazil, Russia, India and China. These economies had an amazing run for the next decade, and emerged as the biggest and fastest growing emerging markets. However, since 2014 there has been some divergence in the BRICs’ economic performance. In this course, we look at the economic experiences of the BRIC countries for the past several decades. We discuss the reasons that contributed to their exceptional growth rates, with particular emphasis on their transformation into market economies, and the reasons for their eventual divergence. We also analyze some of the challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP

Game Theory in Social Sciences
AS.180.217 (01)

Game Theory is the study of multiple person decision problems in which the well-being of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. Such problems arise frequently in economics, political science, business, military science and many other areas. In this course, we will learn how to model different social situations as games and how to use solution concepts to understand players' behavior. We will consider various examples from different fields and will play several games in class. The emphasis of the class is on the conceptual analysis and applications and we will keep the level of mathematical technicalities at the minimum -- high school algebra and one term of calculus will be sufficient. Students who took AS.180.117 are not eligible to take AS.180.217.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Chen, Ying
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, BEHB-SOCSCI

Faculty Research in Economics
AS.180.203 (01)

This course will consist of a series of informal lectures by various professors in the Department of Economics. Each lecture will consist of a description of a professional research project which he/she has undertaken over the course of his/her professional career.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 2:50PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Investing as a Liberal Art
AS.180.219 (01)

This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of institutional investment management, aimed at liberal arts majors. We will study a range of multidisciplinary sources in order to better understand how surprisingly multifaceted and rich the world of investing really is. Financial markets are information processing technologies that link together current events, science, engineering, medicine, politics, sports and entertainment, culture and society. To survive and thrive as an investor in financial markets, humans must embark on a journey of lifelong learning, using both their right and left brains to trace patterns across wildly different fields, and across time in a dynamic world. Traditional courses in financial economics necessarily leave these “distribution requirements” to other departments. This course is intended to help guide students to tie together some of these disparate threads.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Rowe, Joshua
  • Room: Wyman Park 350
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN

Economics of Health and Education in South Asia
AS.180.229 (01)

Human capital is an important factor of economic growth in South Asian economies, along with physical capital and technology. Addressing health and education challenges has implications for improving a country’s human capital formation and income growth. In this course, we look at past and present health and educational outcomes in South Asian Countries. We discuss the gaps in access to education and health care services, the quality of education and health care services as well as the impacts on the productivity of the labor force. We also empirically analyze the link between economic growth and human capital development. Furthermore, we focus on some challenges and future policy options for economies in South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Hackerman 320
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Health
AS.180.289 (01)

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: De Broucker, Gatien
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Market Design
AS.180.244 (01)

We will study how the rules of a market impact behavior, and in turn whether this behavior leads to (un)desirable outcomes. We will cover how the lessons learned from both successful and failing markets have been used by economists to design new markets. It will help us address questions such as: (i) Can economics help with the shortage of donated kidneys? (ii) How should a ride share service assign cars to clients? (iii) Can changing the way school seats are assigned change the welfare of students in a city? The material is intended to be as accessible as possible, keeping the mathematical technicalities to a minimum (i.e. one-term of calculus would be sufficient).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Fernandez, Marcelo Ariel A
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The History and Future of the Hedge Fund Industry
AS.180.280 (01)

The precursors to modern hedge funds began more than 50 years ago, but in the 1990s the hedge fund, or alternative investments, industry began a period of rapid growth and evolution. With growth came controversy. Some argue that hedge funds, by allowing immense amounts of capital to be rapidly and freely deployed, play a vital role in pushing prices toward the efficient markets ideal. Others claim that hedge funds may accentuate speculative price dynamics, threatening the stability of the financial sector. While many hedge funds claim to offer outstanding returns to investors, data suggest that many clients end up paying high fees for unspectacular results. This course examines these and other controversies, while tracing the history of the alternative investments industry over the last 25 years.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Heerdt, Kevin M.
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN

Microeconomic Theory
AS.180.301 (02)

An introduction to the modern theory of allocation of resources, starting with the theories of the individual consumer and producer, and proceeding to analysis of systems of interacting individuals, first in the theory of exchange, then to systems which include production as well. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Daley, Brendan
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Financial Markets and Institutions
AS.180.266 (01)

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Feinman, Josh
  • Room: Shaffer 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Economics of Antitrust
AS.180.310 (01)

This course explores the economic rationale for, and consequence of, antitrust laws. In addition to economic analysis we will study landmark antitrust cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Macroeconomic Theory
AS.180.302 (01)

The course provides a treatment of macroeconomic theory including a static analysis of the determination of output, employment, the price level, the rate of interest, and a dynamic analysis of growth, inflation, and business cycles. In addition, the use and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy to bring about full employment, price stability, and steady economic growth will be discussed. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, T 6:00PM - 6:50PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Macroeconomic Theory
AS.180.302 (02)

The course provides a treatment of macroeconomic theory including a static analysis of the determination of output, employment, the price level, the rate of interest, and a dynamic analysis of growth, inflation, and business cycles. In addition, the use and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy to bring about full employment, price stability, and steady economic growth will be discussed. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa
AS.180.223 (01)

Many sub-Saharan African countries are among the least developed countries in the world. In this course, we explore the economic development experiences of African countries, with more focus on sub-Saharan Africa. The course starts with a historical perspective, delves into development strategies, and examines evidence on successes and failures of some case study countries. We conclude by analyzing the many challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process. Elements of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics are required prerequisites. There would be group presentations on assigned readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance
AS.180.303 (01)

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; capital account liberalization and the choice of the exchange rate regime in emerging markets. The analysis will be motivated by current policy issues but will also be based on mathematical models of the international economy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Jeanne, Olivier
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Information and Investing Seminar
AS.180.285 (01)

The course will seek to discuss and illuminate the information (news reports, industry reports, government statistics, and proprietary indicators) that investors use to make investment decisions. The course will be conducted in the framework of a weekly investment committee format wherein information is processed to maximize an investment portfolio’s return to risk. Each class will be conducted in two parts. The first part will require students to share with the class information gathered from their assigned specialty (e.g.: fixed income, equities, emerging markets, commodities) and the second part will require group interaction as to what decisions need to be made to a hypothetical portfolio in order to maximize objectives. The course will require regular reading of financial and economic news as well as numerous assigned industry and academic research related to global finance. Other: this course will require quite a bit of reading and regular interaction in group discussion and with the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Heerdt, Kevin M.
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (01)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/65
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Microeconomic Theory
AS.180.301 (01)

An introduction to the modern theory of allocation of resources, starting with the theories of the individual consumer and producer, and proceeding to analysis of systems of interacting individuals, first in the theory of exchange, then to systems which include production as well. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Daley, Brendan
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rich Countries, Poor Countries
AS.180.361 (01)

Why are some countries rich while some other countries poor? Why does a country’s income per person generally grow over time? We try to analyze these questions using the theoretical and empirical growth literature. We will study seminal growth models, and also try to explain cross-country income differences in terms of factors like geography, institutions and global integration. Knowledge of regression analysis (including instrumental variables estimation) is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Causal Inference: Using big (and small) data and empirical tools to answer economic questions
AS.180.375 (01)

The purpose of the course is to show how experimental, quasi-experimental, and non- experimental methods can be used to advance scientific knowledge about topics in economics and answer important public policy and business questions. It will teach students the empirical techniques required to analyze data to draw causal inference. The course will begin with a focus on the use of experimental methods in economics. Students will then proceed to learn and apply alternative empirical methods that can be employed to establish cause and effect when data are not obtained from a fully randomized setting. The tools and topics that are covered will be relevant to students interested in economics or other social sciences.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Isen, Adam M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Macroeconomic Strategies
AS.180.336 (01)

Will sketch out a strategy for anticipating economic turning points. Business cycle basics, monetary policy/financial market/real economy interactions will be reviewed. Long-term growth issues will be explored.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN

Econometrics
AS.180.334 (02)

Introduction to the methods of estimation in economic research. The first part of the course develops the primary method employed in economic research, the method of least squares. This is followed by an investigation of the performance of the method in a variety of important situations. The development of a way to handle many of the situations in which ordinary least squares is not useful, the method of instrumental variables, concludes the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Wright, Jonathan H
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

On Keynesian Economics and the Economics of Keynes
AS.180.347 (01)

This course charts a narrative for the evolution of macroeconomics from its very initiation to its present formulation in a way that is sensitive to issues of principle and of policy, and without becoming totally subservient to the disciplinary boundaries within which the problems are formulated and studied. Rather than macroeconomics as a subject that takes its shape in current conventional texts, the focus of the course shall be how it got there. As such, it touches on the development of ideas and intellectual history. The course will be mathematically self-contained but will pre-suppose conceptual sophistication that one expects after completion of courses in micro and macroeconomics at the intermediate level. The course is open to students in the sister-disciplines in anthropology, political science, and sociology, but it would be advisable for interested students in these departments to talk to the instructors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Khan, Mohammed Ali
  • Room: Clark 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics
AS.180.389 (01)

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nick W
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, BEHB-SOCSCI

Econometrics
AS.180.334 (03)

Introduction to the methods of estimation in economic research. The course begins with a review of basic statistics. This is followed by developing the primary method employed in economic research, the method of least squares, and an investigation of the performance of this method in a variety of important situations. The course considers a way to handle many of the situations in which ordinary least squares is not useful, the method of instrumental variables. The modeling of economic time series, binary dependent variables, panel data and differences in differences are all also considered. Applications are intended to showcase how the tools of econometrics can be brought to bear on important policy questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Li, Lixiong
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Econometrics
AS.180.334 (01)

Introduction to the methods of estimation in economic research. The course begins with a review of basic statistics. This is followed by developing the primary method employed in economic research, the method of least squares, and an investigation of the performance of this method in a variety of important situations. The course considers a way to handle many of the situations in which ordinary least squares is not useful, the method of instrumental variables. The modeling of economic time series, binary dependent variables, panel data and differences in differences are all also considered. Applications are intended to showcase how the tools of econometrics can be brought to bear on important policy questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Li, Lixiong
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economics of Race, Gender and Culture
AS.180.349 (01)

This course will overview popular causal inference methods and their applications in the economics of race, gender, and culture. For each causal inference method, the class will cover the econometric theory and how to implement the method in the STATA program. Students will solve many STATA exercises in class, so they must bring a laptop to those classes. Next, we will discuss papers that used the method to answer a research question about race, gender, and culture. The topics to cover include how to show there is racial/gender discrimination and how preference is formed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Hwang, Yujung
  • Room: Greenhouse 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/8
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Labor Economics
AS.180.351 (01)

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Investment-Portfolio Management
AS.180.367 (01)

Investment securities and their markets, especially the stock market. The relations between expected return and risk. The determination of security prices. Financial portfolio selection. The assessment of the performance of managed portfolios.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Bianchi, Francesco
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/60
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Econometrics
AS.180.334 (02)

Introduction to the methods of estimation in economic research. The course begins with a review of basic statistics. This is followed by developing the primary method employed in economic research, the method of least squares, and an investigation of the performance of this method in a variety of important situations. The course considers a way to handle many of the situations in which ordinary least squares is not useful, the method of instrumental variables. The modeling of economic time series, binary dependent variables, panel data and differences in differences are all also considered. Applications are intended to showcase how the tools of econometrics can be brought to bear on important policy questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Li, Lixiong
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economics of Transition and Institutional Change
AS.180.233 (01)

This course will introduce students to the comparative analysis of institutions of existing capitalist systems and to the historical evolution of those institutions. By comparing the economic systems of different nations, we will try to reveal the institutional setups that either contribute or hinder economic performance. We will also examine the process of countries transforming their economies and investigate the factors that determine the differences in reforms’ outcomes between countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 4:30PM - 5:20PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Corporate Finance
AS.180.263 (01)

This course is an introduction to the financial management of a corporation. Students study the following broad questions. How should a firm decide whether to invest in a new project? How much debt and equity should a firm use to finance its activities? How should a firm pay its investors? How do taxes affect a firm’s investment and financing decisions? What determines the value of a firm? The emphasis throughout the course is on the economic principles that underlie answers to these questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Duffee, Greg R
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/60
  • PosTag(s): CLE-ENTR

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Microeconomic Theory
AS.180.301 (02)

An introduction to the modern theory of allocation of resources, starting with the theories of the individual consumer and producer, and proceeding to analysis of systems of interacting individuals, first in the theory of exchange, then to systems which include production as well. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Urban Economics
AS.180.239 (01)

This course introduces students to the major ideas of modern urban economics focused on the causes and consequences of urban economic growth, urban poverty and a city's quality of life. We will analyze basic questions such as; Why is Silicon Valley in Silicon Valley? Why did Beijing become so polluted? Why is crime high in Baltimore? Why does rich San Francisco face a homelessness challenge? The role of federal, state, and local government in urban life will be explored.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Health Economics & Policy
AS.180.333 (01)

This course covers economic models to understand the determinants of health, the demand for health services, the market supply of health services in competitive and non-competitive markets, the provision of health insurance, access to prescription drugs, and the process of innovation and diffusion in health. It exposes the students to the main market failures in healthcare as well as analyzes health policy options to solve these market shortcomings. The course provides an overview of recent advances in the field of health economics in the areas of research methods, data analysis, and well-establish findings while including the discussion of unsolved issues in the field. Recommended background: AS.180.289

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Trujillo, Antonio Jose
  • Room: Clark 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Tools for Writing a Research Paper in Economics
AS.180.369 (01)

This course will introduce students to the components involved in writing a research paper in economics or other quantitative disciplines, by spending the semester having them writing such a paper. Early in the semester, each student will pick a topic for their paper, which will consist just of a brief description of the question (probably a topic they have studied in a previous course). As the semester progresses, the student will learn how to flesh out this germ of a topic into a full-length paper using many of the internet and other tools that are used by scholars in their own research. These include tools for exploring a topic (Google Scholar; ChatGPT; Wikipedia); compiling a bibliography of references to your subject (LitMaps; PaperPile); creating a document with appropriate content (Jupyter notebooks); project management and collaboration via GitHub; generation and incorporation of figures and tables; and the preparation of slide presentations. This will be a hands-on course: Students will bring their laptops to the lecture and the use of the tools will be taught live and interactively. Writing assignments will take the form of Jupyter notebooks (or, for any graduate student enrollees, LaTeX documents). Recommended Course Background: some familiarity with python or other modern programming languages (though having taken a formal course in such a language is not required).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Carroll, Chris
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Public Economics
AS.180.352 (01)

This course explores issues related to expenditure and tax policies of governments, as well as views regarding the purpose of government and criteria for evaluating government actions. The course also includes a discussion of how group or collective choices are made within society, how environmental policies affect the level of pollution, and the importance of public debt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sex, Drugs and Dynamic Optimization: The Economics of Risky Behavior
AS.180.363 (01)

We apply the tools of economic analysis to understand behaviors that are enjoyable today, but may have negative consequences in the future.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM 08-28-2023 to 12-08-2023
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nick W
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Economics of Uncertainty and Information
AS.180.309 (01)

In this course we'll discuss the theory of decision making in the face of risk, the theory of risk aversion and its applications to financial and insurance markets. Building on the theory of individual decision making under risk, we will study the economic implications of asymmetric information, the type of market failures produced by adverse selection and moral hazard problems, and the models that were advanced to analyze these problems, including incentive contracts, screening and signaling equilibria.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Karni, Edi
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Debates in Macroeconomics
AS.180.231 (01)

This course covers some of the more contentious current debates in macroeconomics. Topics include: recent fiscal policy (did the 2021 stimulus overdo it? did workers benefit from the 2017 cut in the corporate tax?); unconventional monetary policies (have they helped?); modern monetary theory (sound doctrine or hokum?); why did interest rates trend lower for decades? backlash against globalization (warranted? unprecedented?); immigration (economic bane or boon?); rising income inequality (causes? consequences? pervasiveness?); has competition waned in US markets? Students will use the tools of economics to analyze these and other pressing issues. Though definitive answers may prove elusive, sound economic analysis can shed considerable light, not least by unmasking the political biases that often drive protagonists on both sides of these debates.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Feinman, Josh
  • Room: Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN

Microeconomic Theory
AS.180.301 (01)

An introduction to the modern theory of allocation of resources, starting with the theories of the individual consumer and producer, and proceeding to analysis of systems of interacting individuals, first in the theory of exchange, then to systems which include production as well. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Environmental Economics
AS.180.246 (01)

In this course we will study the role of the government in the regulation of the environment. In the first half of the course we will take a broad overview of environmental economics. We will focus on evaluating the effectiveness and trade-offs associated with various tools used to regulate the environment, covering topics related to market failures, pollution regulation, and regulation under uncertainty. In the second half of the course, we take a more applied approach and consider topics related to particular environmental issues including climate change, study the functioning of particular industries such as energy and electricity, and consider challenges to regulation such as enforcement, international borders, and unknown control costs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Elliott, Jonathan Tyler
  • Room: Shaffer 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Gender Economics
AS.180.249 (01)

"We've begun to raise daughters more like sons... but few have the courage to raise our sons more like our daughters." ― Gloria Steinem This course aims to explore the differences in economic outcomes observed among women and men. We will study those differences in earnings, income, asset ownership, hours of work, unpaid work, poverty, and the allocation of resources within the household. The course explores the gender dimensions of paid labor and how gender roles in unpaid work and in caring labor impact how men and women participate in the formal and informal economy. It will evaluate women’s perspectives and experiences in the United States and around the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Information and Investing Seminar
AS.180.285 (01)

The course will seek to discuss and illuminate the information (news reports, industry reports, government statistics, and proprietary indicators) that investors use to make investment decisions. The course will be conducted in the framework of a weekly investment committee format wherein information is processed to maximize an investment portfolio’s return to risk. Each class will be conducted in two parts. The first part will require students to share with the class information gathered from their assigned specialty (e.g.: fixed income, equities, emerging markets, commodities) and the second part will require group interaction as to what decisions need to be made to a hypothetical portfolio in order to maximize objectives. The course will require regular reading of financial and economic news as well as numerous assigned industry and academic research related to global finance. Other: this course will require quite a bit of reading and regular interaction in group discussion and with the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Heerdt, Kevin M.
  • Room: Gilman 35
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Demystifying Alternative Investments
AS.180.311 (01)

An introduction to alternative investments taught by a hedge fund industry professional. This course will explore alternative asset classes including hedge funds, private equity, and real assets. Students will investigate the relationship between investment managers, institutional capital allocators, and the banking system. The class will examine the role alternative assets play in an institutional portfolio. Select JHU alumni and institutional investors will share firsthand insight throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Ginsberger, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN

International Monetary Economics
AS.180.242 (01)

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crisis, the choice of exchange rate, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Macroeconomic Theory
AS.180.302 (02)

The course provides a treatment of macroeconomic theory including a static analysis of the determination of output, employment, the price level, the rate of interest, and a dynamic analysis of growth, inflation, and business cycles. In addition, the use and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy to bring about full employment, price stability, and steady economic growth will be discussed. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Ball, Laurence M
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Debt Crises and Financial Crises
AS.180.332 (01)

This course will provide students with the theoretical tools and historical context to understand financial crises and debt crises. We will review famous examples, such as the banking panics of the Great Depression and the Eurozone Sovereign Debt Crises, and use economic theory to understand how and why crises happen, as well as how policies can be designed to prevent them or mitigate their effects. Topics to be covered include banking crises, currency crises, sovereign debt crises, private debt crises, panics, and the relationships between them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Fourakis, Stelios Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/25
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN, INST-ECON

Macroeconomic Theory
AS.180.302 (01)

The course provides a treatment of macroeconomic theory including a static analysis of the determination of output, employment, the price level, the rate of interest, and a dynamic analysis of growth, inflation, and business cycles. In addition, the use and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy to bring about full employment, price stability, and steady economic growth will be discussed. A grade of C or higher is recommended in Elements of Micro (AS 180.102) and Elements of Macro (AS 180.101) to take this course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Ball, Laurence M
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/42
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Econometrics
AS.180.334 (01)

Introduction to the methods of estimation in economic research. The first part of the course develops the primary method employed in economic research, the method of least squares. This is followed by an investigation of the performance of the method in a variety of important situations. The development of a way to handle many of the situations in which ordinary least squares is not useful, the method of instrumental variables, concludes the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM 01-22-2024 to 04-26-2024
  • Instructor: Wright, Jonathan H
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Location Term Course Details
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.001.132 (01)FYS: Exploring Economic InequalityW 9:00AM - 11:30AMMorgan, Barbara AnneHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (85)Elements of MacroeconomicsKodua, NinoOnlineSummer 2023
AS.180.102 (85)Elements of MicroeconomicsZheng, XudongOnlineSummer 2023
AS.001.149 (01)FYS: What Is Poverty? A View from Economics and the Social SciencesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMoffitt, Robert AHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (07)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (08)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.102 (04)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.214 (01)The Economic Experience of the BRIC CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.217 (01)Game Theory in Social SciencesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChen, YingHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.203 (01)Faculty Research in EconomicsW 1:30PM - 2:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.219 (01)Investing as a Liberal ArtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMRowe, JoshuaHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.229 (01)Economics of Health and Education in South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMFatehin, SohaniHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.289 (01)Economics of HealthM 4:30PM - 7:00PMDe Broucker, GatienHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.244 (01)Market DesignTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMFernandez, Marcelo Ariel AHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.280 (01)The History and Future of the Hedge Fund IndustryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHeerdt, Kevin M.Homewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.301 (02)Microeconomic TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMDaley, BrendanHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.266 (01)Financial Markets and InstitutionsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFeinman, JoshHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.310 (01)Economics of AntitrustTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHamilton, Bruce WHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.302 (01)Macroeconomic TheoryTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, T 6:00PM - 6:50PMPoliakova, LudmilaHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.302 (02)Macroeconomic TheoryTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PMPoliakova, LudmilaHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.223 (01)Economic Development in Sub-Saharan AfricaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.303 (01)Topics in International Macroeconomics and FinanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJeanne, OlivierHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.285 (01)Information and Investing SeminarTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHeerdt, Kevin M.Homewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.261 (01)Monetary AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.301 (01)Microeconomic TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMDaley, BrendanHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.361 (01)Rich Countries, Poor CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.375 (01)Causal Inference: Using big (and small) data and empirical tools to answer economic questionsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMIsen, Adam MHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.336 (01)Macroeconomic StrategiesW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBarbera, BobHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.334 (02)EconometricsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMWright, Jonathan HHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.347 (01)On Keynesian Economics and the Economics of KeynesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKhan, Mohammed AliHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.389 (01)Social Policy Implications of Behavioral EconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPapageorge, Nick WHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.334 (03)EconometricsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMLi, LixiongHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.334 (01)EconometricsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLi, LixiongHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.349 (01)Economics of Race, Gender and CultureT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHwang, YujungHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.351 (01)Labor EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.367 (01)Investment-Portfolio ManagementTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBianchi, FrancescoHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.334 (02)EconometricsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMLi, LixiongHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.233 (01)Economics of Transition and Institutional ChangeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, LudmilaHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 4:30PM - 5:20PMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.263 (01)Corporate FinanceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDuffee, Greg RHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.301 (02)Microeconomic TheoryTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMFatehin, SohaniHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.239 (01)Urban EconomicsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMFatehin, SohaniHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.333 (01)Advanced Health Economics & PolicyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMTrujillo, Antonio JoseHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.369 (01)Tools for Writing a Research Paper in EconomicsM 3:00PM - 5:30PMCarroll, ChrisHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.352 (01)Public EconomicsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMFatehin, SohaniHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.363 (01)Sex, Drugs and Dynamic Optimization: The Economics of Risky BehaviorTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPapageorge, Nick WHomewood CampusFall 2023
AS.180.309 (01)Economics of Uncertainty and InformationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKarni, EdiHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.231 (01)Debates in MacroeconomicsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFeinman, JoshHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.301 (01)Microeconomic TheoryTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMFatehin, SohaniHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.246 (01)Environmental EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMElliott, Jonathan TylerHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.249 (01)Gender EconomicsWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.285 (01)Information and Investing SeminarW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHeerdt, Kevin M.Homewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.311 (01)Demystifying Alternative InvestmentsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberger, SarahHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.242 (01)International Monetary EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.302 (02)Macroeconomic TheoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBall, Laurence MHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.332 (01)Debt Crises and Financial CrisesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMFourakis, Stelios StephenHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.302 (01)Macroeconomic TheoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMBall, Laurence MHomewood CampusSpring 2024
AS.180.334 (01)EconometricsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMWright, Jonathan HHomewood CampusSpring 2024