ball

Laurence M. Ball

Department Chair
Professor

Wyman Park Building 566
By Appointment
410.516.7605
lball@jhu.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Biography
Research
Teaching

In addition to my duties at Hopkins, I am a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Visiting Scholar at the International Monetary Fund. I have previously visited a number of central banks, including the Federal Reserve, the Bank of Japan, the Bank of England, and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand. My research focuses on unemployment, inflation, and fiscal and monetary policy, and I am the author of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets (Worth Publishers, second edition 2012).

Recent Papers

"What Else Can Central Banks Do?" (with Joseph Gagnon, Patrick Honohan, and Signe Krogstrup), International Center for Monetary and Banking Studies, September 2016.

"The Fed and Lehman Brothers", July 2016.

"Monetary Policy for a High-Pressure Economy", Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, March 2015.

"A Phillips Curve with Anchored Expectations and Short-Term Unemployment" (with Sandeep Mazumder), November 2014.

"Long Term Damage from the Great Recession in OECD Countries", May 2014.

"Fiscal Policy and Full Employment", April 2014.

"Unemployment in Latin America and the Caribbean" (with Nicolás De Roux and Marc Hofstetter), Open Economies Review, July 2013.

"The Case for Four Percent Inflation", Central Bank Review, May 2013

"Okun’s Law: Fit at 50?", January 2013.

"Short-run Money Demand", Journal of Monetary Economics, November 2012.

"Ben Bernanke and the Zero Bound", February 2012.

"Inflation Dynamics and the Great Recession" (with Sandeep Mazumder), Brookings Papers, Spring 2011.

The Performance of Alternative Monetary Regimes, June 2010.

"Policy Responses to Exchange-Rate Movements", Open Economies Review, March 2010.

"Hysteresis in Unemployment: Old and New Evidence", March 2009.

 

Non-Technical Writings

"What else can central banks do?" (with Joseph Gagnon, Patrick Honohan, and Signe Krogstrup), Vox EU. September 2016.

"The Fed and Lehman Brothers: A new narrative", Vox EU. August 2016.

"Comment on 'Inflation and Activity,' by Blanchard, Cerutti, and Summers",  August 2015.

"Understanding Recent US Inflation", Vox EU. January, 2015.

"The Great Recessions's Long-Term Damage", Vox EU. July 2014.

"The Case for Four Percent Inflation," Vox EU. April, 2013.

"The Myth of Jobless Recoveries", January 2013.

"Jobs and growth are still linked (that is, Okun's Law still holds)", January 2013.

"Ben Bernanke and the zero bound", February 2012.

"Painful Medicine", September 2011.

Testimony on "Federal Debt and the U.S. Economy", Joint Economic Committee, September 2011

"The Unemployment Crisis", January 2011.

"Testimony on Federal Reserve policy, House Committee on Financial Services", March 2010.

 

Textbooks

"Money, Banking, and Financial Markets", 2nd ed., Worth Publishers, 2011.

"Macroeconomics and the Financial System" (with N. Gregory Mankiw), Worth Publishers, 2011.

 

Litigation

"Ball v. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System"

Economics 261 -- Monetary Analysis:
Analysis of money, banking, and government debt, with emphasis on coherent models with microeconomic foundations. Topics include barter and commodity money, monetary institutions in historical perspective, international monetary systems; portfolio theory, liquidity, financial intermediation, bank risk, central banking; debts and deficits, savings and investment, the temptation of inflation. The course aims at providing students with the means to analyze monetary questions and institutions.

Course Website

Economics 302 -- Macroeconomic Theory:
This undergraduate course provides a treatment of macroeconomic theory including a static analysis of the determination of output, employment, the price level, the rate of interest, and a dynamic analysis of growth, inflation, and business cycles. In addition, the use and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy to bring about full employment, price stability, and steady economic growth will be discussed.

Course Website

Economics 605 -- Advanced Macroeconomics:
This is a graduate course covering selected topics in macroeconomics. These include nominal rigidities, dynamic-consistency theories of inflation, inflation inertia and the costs of disinflation, monetary policy, costs and benefits of price stability, benefits of output stabilization, alternative policy rules, measuring inflation, unemployment, efficiency-wage theories, the behavior of the NAIRU, macro in middle-income countries, high inflation and stabilization, currency crises.