Peter Huether ‘15

“In the major, you will learn how to critically analyze issues and use statistical methods to discern causal effects. I learned how to measure the effects of public policies using econometric research. Take more math than required if you want to do economic research, but also explore the other social sciences such as political science and sociology.”

Peter Huether traveled the short distance from his home in New Jersey to Hopkins because “I liked the atmosphere when I visited and how focused and driven the students seemed to be. I also liked Hopkins’ research emphasis.” Peter chose to combine Economics with the new major in Global Environmental Change & Sustainability. “I knew I wanted to do policy work, probably environmental policy, and I knew that a background in economics would be crucial to understand policy issues. I also thoroughly enjoyed AP Economics in high school and wanted to continue studying it in college.”
Peter enjoyed classes that connected coursework to policy and real world issues. I gravitated towards courses that present research analyzing the efficacy of various policies. Some memorable examples of this happened in my classes Economics of Poverty and Inequality and Economics of Discrimination.”
Extra-curriculars at Hopkins included Real Food Hopkins which successfully lobbied for an increase in the amount of sustainable food on campus, membership in the service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega (APO) and volunteering in Baltimore City.
Peter was accepted to the competitive Aitchison Fellowship, spending a semester in DC, and interned as a research assistant at both Resources for the Future, an environmental think-tank, and the Environmental Protection Agency. “Both combined my interests of economic research and environmental policy and I got a good glimpse into the world DC policy world.” After graduation Pete will be an assistant analyst at the Congressional Budget Office working on federal tax revenue projections. “ I knew I wanted to be in DC and possibly keep working in economic and social science research. But eventually I want to go back to graduate school for either public policy or economics and ultimately return to working as a policy analyst in DC. “
What advice does Peter have for prospective majors? “In the major, you will learn how to critically analyze issues and use statistical methods to discern causal effects. I learned how to measure the effects of public policies using econometric research. Take more math than required if you want to do economic research, but also explore the other social sciences such as political science and sociology.”