Jonathan Lowrey ‘15

“Economics requires you to take a logical framework and apply intuitive reasoning to determine outcomes, a thought process that has been invaluable in my engineering courses. Economics is not about money, but decisions. Once you start looking beyond dollar signs, economic thinking can provide insight into almost any problem you come across.”

Hailing from California, Jonathan Lowrey was excited to attend college on the other side of the country. He liked Baltimore on his first visit, and was attracted to Hopkins because it presented a wide range of academic pursuits. His original plan was to major in BioMedical Engineering, but along the way he also picked up a major in Economics.
“Economics was a strong interest from high school, and to follow this interest I initially took economics classes to fill my distribution requirements. About halfway through my sophomore year, I realized I really enjoyed my economics coursework and found it highly rewarding, so I made the choice to pursue it as a full major, and I’m glad I did. Throughout my 4 years, my favorite classes have consistently been my economics classes, so there’s a lot that stuck in my mind. One that was fun for me was the game theory class I took freshman year, where Professor Harrington structured the decision to have a senior option as a game. Then, he actually brought in a bingo wheel to randomize the outcome! I also enjoyed how the coursework, particularly in macroeconomics, reflected new thinking post-recession.”
Jonathan agrees with many students when he recognizes that the skills and way of thinking economics transmits are so broadly applicable. “Economics requires you to take a logical framework and apply intuitive reasoning to determine outcomes, a thought process that has been invaluable in my engineering courses. Economics is not about money, but decisions. Once you start looking beyond dollar signs, economic thinking can provide insight into almost any problem you come across.”
After graduation Jon will be working as an integration engineer at Epic Systems, a healthcare software company based in Madison, WI, and he is excited to be a part of an important and growing industry. Any advice for students considering economics? “Be ready to engage with your professors and TAs. I’ve found that economics faculty are some of the most outgoing professors on campus, and are very willing to interact on a personal level. And don’t be afraid of jumping into the upper level classes. The 300 level classes can be some of the most fun.”